Book week, day 1

Over on Facebook, Quentin May tagged me in a kind of internet chain letter. The challenge is to post 7 books I love (1 per day). No explanations, no reviews. Just covers.

I’m also supposed to nominate a friends to take up the challenge, but I won’t be calling out anyone by name. If you’d like to participate, consider yourself challenged.

Let’s promote literacy and a book list. (Does this promote literacy? You are, even now, reading words.)

“No Comment” by Shirvanian

Presuming that money is like bread

A relative of mine recently shared a gif on Facebook of ‘Five Best Sentences’. I try not to post whenever somebody is wrong on the internet, but responding to the list made me realize something about so-called economic conservatives:

Many conservative truisms only make sense if you assume money is like bread and that anything of value is like money.

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Phriday phishing

I’ve heard from several students and former students today who got suspicious e-mail claiming to be from me. Maybe you got one, too?

The body of the messages mostly just said “Hello, are you available?” However, one student received a message which went on to ask if he could pick up something at the store.

The e-mail sig said “Dr. P.D. Magnus”, but I don’t think I ever write my name that way. It also gave my UAlbany rank and information, which I only do in e-mails that need to sound official and heavy-hitting.

The from line on these e-mails was tapperrea.maxwell.syr@gmail.com — To be clear, that’s not me. If they contact you, don’t pick up anything at the store for them.

Education by any other name would still be next to Humanities

When the UAlbany uptown campus was built, all the buildings were given functional names. The Philosophy department is in the Humanities building, on the podium next to Education and across from Business Administration.

Here’s the rub: The actual school of ed was moved downtown long ago and so doesn’t have anything to do with the Education building. The business school got a shiny new building several years ago, and so we’ve had to awkwardly distinguish the new business building from the old business building (which hasn’t actually housed any of the business classes).

Continue reading “Education by any other name would still be next to Humanities”